Still on the Trans-Siberian Railroad

Still on the Trans-Siberian Railroad

Once I was shown my cubicle, I put my suitcase on the plywood slat and attempted to close the door.  That was when I locked myself in and couldn’t figure out how to reopen the door.  I pounded and hollered until Peter, the train car attendant, came and opened the door.  That’s when he showed me the bell on the wall.   A short, hefty lady entered my  space.  She was Russian and spoke English.  I immediately saw her as an asset, having no knowledge of Russian.   She pulled up the slat and behold, there was an open space for my suitcase to be stowed under my bed.  The table below the window folded up or down depending on use.  Peter brought us tea in a silver holder, a tall glass, and also some cookies.  That helped.  It didn’t take long for me to discover that there was first class and last class.  When I had booked my reservation, the first class was twice the price.  The next class was more reasonable and I mistakenly thought it was second class.  It wasn’t.   The passengers on my car were mostly European.  Two men were on one side and an elderly couple on the other side.  Peter showed me the bathrooms.  They were as small as the toilets on an airplane.  A car to the rear of the train contained the shower stalls.  An announcement led me to the club car where the brave souls were given the rules and procedures necessary for the journey.  The champagne was relaxing, but not for long as the train left the station.  It was fortunate that I don’t suffer from motion sickness.