New York City

New York City

We remained at the Russian Vodka room enjoying the international conversation and company.  It was 2 a.m before our Egyptian taxi driver deposited us at the Waldorf.  The lobby was still busy.   Since the breakfast buffet was over $20, we chose to walk a block and found a breakfast deli where we dined on eggs, toast, bacon and coffee for $6.  The place was busy.  Everyone was texting or looking at their Ipad or reading the paper.  We took a taxi to the jewelry district on Park Avenue.  He was from Bangaldesh.  The non-descript office building was securely guarded.  We presented our ID’s and were ushered through a turnstile and directed to an upper floor where the Pearl Factory was located.  We were buzzed into a modest set of offices and ushered into the office of the owner, Eddie.  Sitting opposite his desk, we were told about black Tahitian pearls.  They come in various colors and sizes.  They must have a sphereometricity of less then 2% to be judged round.  He told us about the nacre, the thickness of the pearl, the luster and the color.  Irregular shaped pearls are described as baroque.  He then presented us with many strands of beautiful pearls from white to greenish black.  The black Tahitian pearls are the current rage and are produced by oysters that are as much as two feet wide.  I had never seen an oyster that large.   Once an oyster is touched by human hands, the pearl it produces is known as cultured.  The Japanese have perfected the science of producing cultured pearls.  We learned that Eddie’s grandfather emigrated from Israel and that he is third generation pearl businessman.  Before taking over the business, he sold tee shirts at the Cotton Bowl in Dallas and did other interesting jobs.  Linda purchased a strand of baroque Tahitian pearls for a modest price and we left the business for the streets of New York.