Knock-Offs

Knock-Offs

The waiter at the Chinese restaurant assured us that all we had to do was walk the streets and someone would contact us.  On the third block a young Eurasian  girl walked past us and said, “Watches.”   She was walking fast.  Since I was limping from a trip and fall, Linda followed her around the corner.  By the time I caught up with them, the girl was on her cell phone looking up and down the street as if in a spy novel. We conveyed that we were interested in watches and purses.  She indicated for us to follow her around another corner.  There we were met by a young man with a cell phone and told to wait five minutes.  We waited and yet another young Eurasian appeared with some worn sheets with colored pictures of watches.  We pointed to the ones we wanted to see, Cartier and Rolex.  He disappeared.  The young girl reappeared and led us around yet another corner and told us to wait five minutes.  After waiting, another young man led us around another corner to a parked black Suburban with darkened windows.  There another young person was waiting with a black plastic bag.  The watches were in plastic bags and looked quite nice.  I selected a Cartier and Linda selected a Rolex.  The price was $75 each.  We offered $50 each and made payment in cash.  For the purses we went through the same routine, the glossy sheets with pictures, walking around corners and examining the products.  Linda purchased two purses for around $125.  They were in a black plastic bag.  It was all quite dramatic.  The young people were nice, friendly and very paranoid.  The taxi driver was from Bangaladesh.  We returned to the Waldorf, cleaned up, changed clothes and set out for an evening of adventure, not that we were lacking.