Hats

Hats

My father always loved a woman wearing a hat. My mother wore hats. He bought them for her. He always wore a white Stetson and took it off whenever he entered a building. Today men wear hats dancing, in restaurants and even in church. Baseball hats are worn backwards in restaurants too. A woman never takes off her hat whether in a building or outdoors. But manners seem to have been thrown out the window. Today anything goes. I have a few favorite hats, choosing from the top shelf of my closet. My favorite is a faded blue straw Stetson that was my mother’s. It’s probably 40 years old. My black felt Stetson is my winter choice. Around the ranch I wear an orange baseball hat with a motorcycle outlined in sequins. Many of the men in southwest Texas wear cowboy hats. A man always looks more attractive in a cowboy hat. It’s always shocking when they remove the hat to display a lack of hair. When I travel I always pack a hat, preferably one that folds or mashes easily. Sometimes I travel with a visor. The sun in remote places can be quite brutal and being fair-skinned I try to protect myself. I loved attending the Kentucky Derby and seeing all the hats. I found it interesting that umbrellas are forbidden at the Derby, supposing that they obstruct the view of others. That is probably why the tradition of hats evolved at the Derby. In any case, I always have a hat in my vehicle. A woman in a hat is a breath of beauty.