Cuban Life

Cuban Life

While in Havana we ventured into the Guanabacoa region, rich in many religious influences.  As part of the cultural exchange program we had the opportunity to visit with a family in Guanabacoa.  The home was protected by walls embedded on top with broken glass and iron gates.  Once inside the compound, the house was clean and airy with a courtyard full of flowering plants as well as a fountain and colorful tile work.  We were seated and  served a small cup of Cuban coffee.   The lady of the house made herself available for any and all questions.  Our guide translated.  We learned that her husband is a private worker with a car repair business.  Her only duaghter works as a tour guide and has a college education.  Her husband served the required two years in the military in Angola.  The family has lived in the house for 50 years and acquired it after the revolution.  The former owner was a lawyer who fled Cuba.  The government awarded the house to her father who was a pediatrician and served the community.  Her sister fled Cuba with the people who stormed the Peruvian embassy.  She was shocked and angry when her sister left, having no idea that her sister had planned to leave.  For years they were estranged but now are on better terms.  Her sister has visited her but she cannot leave Cuba.  Her husband fishes and rides bicycles in his spare time.  She jogs and does aerobics.  They have been robbed 10 times.  Her brother joined her and expressed his desire to visit the U.S. and see a major leage baseball game.  He also wishes there was more to read about baseball.  Internet access is spare and very expensive.  There are no internet cafes.  In order to use the internet, you have to know someone.