Chinese Traditional Medicine

Chinese Traditional Medicine

While in the city of Kaili in China I visited a hospital that treats patients in the traditional as well as the modern medical manner. I visited the traditional treating area and saw patients receiving acupuncture, acupressure and cupping, a method of placing warm cups on targeted areas of the body to relieve pain. I then visited the pharmacy that fills prescriptions. In the attached picture the drawers containing herbs and natural substances is pictured. I saw peach seeds, dried scorpions, cinnamon, tree bark and many other substances I could not identify. A white-coataed attendant sat in front of a computer typing in the combination of elements to be used in the prescription. Most of the prescriptions were a combination that was to be boiled into a tea and ingested. The line was long in front of the window. Across the lobby where the bottles and boxes of pills were prescribed, there was no line. Later that day in the market I witnessed a man sitting on a stool. An ointment had been placed on his chest and he was being wrapped with gauze to keep the ointment in place. The Chinese regard tea as a medicine. I learned that there are over 1600 varieties of tea in China and had occasion to visit a tea shop where I tasted different varieties of tea. The Chinese believe that tea should never be drunk 30 minutes before or after taking medication because it interferes with the effectiveness of the medicine. One of the men in our group had developed a rash while in China. He was instructed to bathe three times a day and drink no tea or alcohol. He also took Benedryl and used an ointment. The rash eventually went away. I personally believe in a combination of both, a holistic approach to treating illness.